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Controlling Killer Bee Swarms – Pest Control;
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Controlling Killer Bee Swarms – Pest Control

Controlling Killer Bee Swarms

Killer bees have been in the United States for several years. They have attacked animals and humans and even experienced beekeepers are cautious of their power. The ancestors of the bee lived in Africa and were introduced to North and South America in 1956 when Brazilian scientists attempted to create a hybrid bee with the honeybee. The Africanized Bee is aggressive, easily agitated and acts like it has a bad attitude. The first bee found in the United States was in 1990 in south Texas. Cold winters are currently slowing the northward travel of the bee, but the Africanized bee seems to be adapting and it is not known how far north the bee may eventually travel. Need Professional Pest Control Help?
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A colony may attack any threat within 100 feet and will pursue for up to one-fourth of a mile. They generally attack when the colony is threatened, when load noises, strong fragrances, shiny jewelry or dark clothes are perceived as threats. There point of attack is the face and ankles. If attacked, a person should run straight and protect their face. The bees are slow and you can generally outrun them. Do not try to hide underwater because the bees will wait for you to surface.
Some people believe it is possible to control killer bee swarms by using narrow frequency band directional sound beams. Experiments need to be performed to see if swarms can be stopped or diverted by this technology. This is going to be extreme pest control.

The important thing is to find whatever narrow range of frequencies will stop the swarm to just stop flying. If a frequency was found that makes the swarm uncomfortable, they might very well stop flying or at least be able to be directed away from their victim. Since we know that the buzz has to include signals to other bees to encourage the whole swarm to attack, a correct signal should be able to stop the attack or at least confuse the swarm into stopping to regroup.

The equipment required to test this theory would be an old warehouse, a beekeeper, bees and sound equipment. Microwave transmitters could be used to try and influence the swarms and lasers and infrared equipment could observe how the interactive sound waves and airflows affect the swarming. More information here on this website